Mockingbird

Poems by American Authors

From , a new book by David Orr.

A young man hiking through a forest is abruptly confronted with a fork in the path. He pauses, his hands in his pockets, and looks back and forth between his options. As he hesitates, images from possible futures flicker past: the young man wading into the ocean, hitchhiking, riding a bus, kissing a beautiful woman, working, laughing, eating, running, weeping. The series resolves at last into a view of a different young man, with his thumb out on the side of a road. As a car slows to pick him up, we realize the driver is the original man from the crossroads, only now he’s accompanied by a lovely woman and a child. The man smiles slightly, as if confident in the life he’s chosen and happy to lend that confidence to a fellow traveler. As the car pulls away and the screen is lit with gold—for it’s a commercial we’ve been watching—the emblem of the Ford Motor Company briefly appears.

The advertisement I’ve just described ran in New Zealand in 2008. And it is, in most respects, a normal piece of smartly assembled and quietly manipulative product promotion. But there is one very unusual aspect to this commercial. Here is what is read by a voice-over artist, in the distinctive vowels of New Zealand, as the young man ponders his choice:

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;

Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim,
Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way,
I doubted if I should ever come back.

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.

It is, of course, “The Road Not Taken” by Robert Frost. In the commercial, this fact is never announced; the audience is expected to recognize the poem unaided. For any mass audience to recognize any poem is (to put it mildly) unusual. For an audience of car buyers in New Zealand to recognize a hundred-year-old poem from a country eight thousand miles away is something else entirely.

See also:
  • carlkruse internet profiles
  • Visit edgesigns.com to find out more regarding awning
  • If you want to Laugh out Loud then check jokes in hindi
  • If you are looking for vietnamese culture then click here .
Source: www.theparisreview.org
RESOURCES
RELATED VIDEO
Poem from My Grave (Version 2) Poetry, Poem by Michael Lee
Poem from My Grave (Version 2) Poetry, Poem by Michael Lee ...
Nikki Giovanni Poem "Nikki-Rosa" read by Katya Schexnaydre
Nikki Giovanni Poem "Nikki-Rosa" read by Katya Schexnaydre ...
If We Must Die Poem by Claude McKay - Poem Hunter
If We Must Die Poem by Claude McKay - Poem Hunter
RELATED FACTS
Share this Post

Related posts

Home American Authors

Home American Authors

JUNE 26, 2017

By Banjokoko American Authors have done it again! They ve delivered another hit song, that really grapples you in with its…

Read More
Old American Authors

Old American Authors

JUNE 26, 2017

NEW YORK – Grammy-award winning singer/songwriter Nate Ruess, alternative rock band American Authors, The Voice season…

Read More